Archive for the ‘PRCA 3330: Readings’ Category

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Chapter 15: Giving Speeches and Presentations

April 26, 2010

                     

Ok so who loves giving speeches????

Yah I don’t know many people either who just love giving speeches either. So when reading this chapter I found the “basics of giving a speech” to be of great help. When you’re in the public relations field your speeches need to be as professional as possible and you need to be able to coach your clients on how to properly present their own speeches too!

So let’s begin to take a look at what Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques (by Dennis L. Wilcox) says about giving a speech!

  • Giving a speech is all about the delivery!!!
  • Know your objective: your speech needs to accomplish something.
  • Structure your message for the audiences ears:

There is no chance to go back, no time to let it slowly digest, no opportunity for clarification. The message must get across now or never.”

  • Tailor all remarks to your audience: find out as much as you can about your audience beforehand. For example the following factors could change how you should present your message: age, occupation, gender, race, education background, vocabulary, group memberships, politics, religion, etc.
  • Give specifics:  the more specific you are about the details of your topic the more likely your audience will remember them. Generalizations get you nowhere.
  • Keep it timely and short: end of story!
  • Use gestures and eye contact to your advantage: this can make or break a speech. This helps to establish your creditability to your audience.— Do realize that nervousness fits into this category and is distracting to your audience.
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Chapter 14: Writing E-mail, Memos, and Proposals

April 23, 2010

Writers waste too much time producing texts that waste even more time for the readers.”

 Richard E. Neff, writer of Communication World

In all your writings (including e-mails, memos, and proposals) you should follow these basic guidlines:

  • Completeness: your information needs to serve a purpose
  • Conciseness: less is better
  • Correctness: be accurate
  • Courtesy: be polite, but not effusive, personal, not overly familiar
  • Responsibility: think about how your information will be received by others

 

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox.

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Chapter 13: Producing Newsletters and Brochures

April 20, 2010

Tips for the ideal layout for newsletters or magazines:

  1. Use white space to your advantage- it’s ok to have it.
  2. Vary your paragraph length
  3. Break up longer stories with subheads in bold
  4. Use bullet list
  5. Use only 2 or 3 fonts
    1. Variety should  come from different size types
    2. Keep articles relatively short- creates more interest for readers
    3. The inside pages should balance one another
      1. If you use strong graphics on one page then balance it with large headlines or graphics on the facing page!

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox.

Check out this video for tips by art director and design critic Angela Riechers. In this video she shows how to layout a design for a food magazine.

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Chapter 12: Tapping the Web and New Media

April 16, 2010
  1. New Media is characterized by:
  • Widespread broadband
  • Cheap/free, easy to use online publishing tools
  • New distribution channels
  • Mobile devices (3-G, camera phones, etc)
  • New Advertising paradigms

2. The World Wide Web is a key tool in the distribution process for public relations professionals.

Writing for the web differs though from writing for print. Here are some tips when publishing on the web:

  • Define and analysis what the purpose of your website, blog, or publication is
  • Design your site with your specific audience in mind
  • Constantly update your site
  • Do not overdue the graphics
  • Make sure your site is not boring and is interactive
  • Use feedback

3. Online writing tips from Shel Holtz, author of Public Relations on the Net

  • Write the way you talk
  • Limit each page to a single concept
  • Use lots of bullet point list
  • Make sure the context needed for readers to understand that page is provided
  • Limit the use of italics and boldface
  • Do not overuse hyperlinks within narrative text
  • Make sure hyperlinks are relevant
  • Provide feedback options for your readers

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques  by Dennis L. Wilcox.

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Chapter 11: Getting Along With Journalist

April 11, 2010

  • When a PR professional adds a bunch of hype to their news release it can make it seem commercial-like and therefore not worth the journalist time.
  • Keep in mind who the journalist’s audience and make sure your press release is worthy of becoming a story.
  • Proper format is key when sending a news release to a journalist
  • Follow journalist deadlines
  • Make sure there is a “news hook” and a clear connection between the promotional item and the news you are announcing. (PRWeek)

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox.

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Chapter 10: Distributing News to the Media

April 10, 2010

1. Online newsrooms should have these five key components:

  1. Contact Info
  2. Corporate Background
  3. News releases and Media Kits
  4. Multimedia Gallery
  5. Search Capabilities

2. Online news releases should include these key components:

  • Keywords
  • Enhanced URL
  • Anchor text/ embedded keywords
  • Multimedia content
  • Social Media Tags

(taken from Vocus, owner of the distribution service PRWeb)

3.  Electronic newswires are the new way to distribute news releases online. Online sites like Business Wire, PR Newswire, and Marketwire distribute these multimedia news releases all over the World Wide Web and allow journalist to access the information in a more efficient manner.

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox.

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Chapter 9: Writing for Television and Radio

April 2, 2010

  1. Radio News Release: is a written new release for the radio
  • Written in all caps, and double space
  • Formatted like a regular news release in regards to letterhead, subject, and contacts
  • Give length of radio news release
  • Most announcers read 150-160 words per minute
  • Written in conventional style=short and strong sentences

2. Audio News Release (ANR):  is a recording of the radio news announcement

  • Two forms:
    • Someone in radio voice reads the whole announcement
    • Use announcer and sound bite from customer, celebrity, etc
  • Preferred length is 60 seconds

3.  Public Service Announcement (PSA): is an unpaid announcement that promotes the programs of the government, serves the public or is for a nonprofit agency.

  • Can be 60, 30, 20, 15, or 10 seconds
  • Submit multiple PSAs on the same subject in various lengths
  • Mail or email scripts to director of public or community affairs NOT the news department
  • Keep it simple
  • Localize your PSA

*This information has been taken from the sixth edition of Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques by Dennis L. Wilcox.